Designation of schools having a religious character (Wales) Order 1999.
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Designation of schools having a religious character (Wales) Order 1999.

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Published by The Stationery Office in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesStatutory Instruments -- 1999 No.1814
The Physical Object
Pagination10p. :
Number of Pages10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18229979M
ISBN 100110828917

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  What schools and academies need to do to get a religious character designation and open as a faith or church school. Published 7 September From. 2 Amendments 5. —(1) Schedule 1 (Schools having a religious character) to the Designation of Schools Having a Religious Character (Independent Schools) (England) Order (a) is amended in accordance with the following provisions of this article. Character of Schools (Designation Procedure) (Independent Schools) (England) Regulations (c). Citation 1. This Order may be cited as the Designation of Schools Having a Religious Character (Independent Schools) (England) Order Interpretation 2.   This Order designates the independent schools listed in the Schedule as having a religious character to the extent set out in that Schedule. Link: The Designation of Schools Having a Religious Character (Independent Schools) (England) (No. 2) Order Source: Related Posts:The Designation of Schools Having a Religious The Designation of Schools Having a .

Admission authorities for schools designated as having a religious character must have regard to any guidance from the body or person representing the religion or religious denomination when constructing faith based admission arrangements, to the extent that the guidance complies with the mandatory provisions and guidelines of this Code. In secular usage, religious education is the teaching of a particular religion (although in the United Kingdom the term religious instruction would refer to the teaching of a particular religion, with religious education referring to teaching about religions in general) and its varied aspects: its beliefs, doctrines, rituals, customs, rites, and personal roles. A faith school is a school in the United Kingdom that teaches a general curriculum but which has a particular religious character or formal links with a religious or faith-based term is most commonly applied to state-funded faith schools, although many independent schools also have religious characteristics.. There are various types of state-funded faith school, including. Almost all Voluntary schools have a religious character, but most Foundation schools and all Community schools do not. Academies and Free Schools are a mixture. 34% of state schools in England and 14% in Wales have a religious character.

Thomas Lickona. "Building Catholic Character: 5 Things Parents Can Do." Catholic Education Resource Center (Ap ). This article is reprinted with permission from the author, Thomas Lickona. The Author. Thomas Lickona, Ph.D., is a psychologist and educator who has been called "the father of modern character education.". Academisation and the 'grey area' between faith and non-religious schools may allow even more schools to assume a religious character by stealth. To avoid this, we need a much clearer definition of 'faith school', argues Alastair Lichten. The Education Act, known as the Butler Act, brought faith schools into the new state system.   SPECIAL schools designated with a Church of England or other reli­gious character are a legal impossi­bility, as things very odd. This is just the sort of provision and care that the Church ought to be committed to making, you might think. Indeed, my practice has clients who would be very glad to pro­vide this very thing. Before their character is formed by the worst aspects of our culture, young people should be helped to reflect on life's largest questions. One can argue that, without religion's call to the transcendent, most of us are more tempted, as the weight lifters were, to make gods of other things: money, pleasure, power, or success at any price.